peace

yield to Gods will

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“Yielding to God’s will can be hard. And sometimes, it really hurts. But it always brings peace.”

-John Perkins, Let Justice Roll Down

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Let Justice Roll Down

racial-reconciliation-mural

When I hear accounts of racial profiling and discrimination across America, I pray hard about how to talk with my brown skinned toddler about injustice. I have the task of training her and imparting certain knowledge that I don’t have as a white woman — and, truly, may not even know I am lacking. (I have written previously about the considerations that we must make as a multiracial family.)

As tensions escalate, I sense that the more significant force behind this unrest is not on whom to place blame for particular incidents, but rather who has the power to change a culture of prejudice.

“How might a transracially adopted black child gain a healthy identity when the world that you’ve created in your home or community does not match this world we live in where . . . [many] don’t care if they grew up in a stable and loving adoptive family? Their skin is still black and according to some, that in and of itself is a crime,” wrote Angela Tucker, a transracial adoptee.

My heart is heavy. All life matters to the Creator.

I am grieved for the mothers of black sons, who — suddenly — upon entering adolescence are no longer cute little boys. They are now profiled as threats.

Thabiti Anyabwile, a father, wrote: “I don’t care about the color of the hands that pull the trigger. They could be pink, brown, sandy. What I care about is the value of my son’s life. What I care about is the dignity and life-destroying devaluing of his life because in this country he is ‘black.’ And the absurdity of it all is that he’s not ‘black’ in every country. Only his own. In Cayman, he was Titus. In Cayman, he was free to be Titus. In the States, he’s ‘a little black boy’ long before he’s ‘Titus.’ And that calculation, the ‘racial’ attribution that happens at the speed of sight, is deadly. It’s deadly.”

Racism and hatred are not new to humanity. Prejudice and arrogance can be inclinations of any culture, heritage, or skin tone.

These are hard, real-life issues of sin. With consequences.

Oh, I long for peace. For shalom — complete peace, wholeness, harmony.

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John M. Perkins writes in his classic book Let Justice Roll Down:

. . . But I think many of us want forgiveness without repentance. I sense this so much as I try to establish relationships with my white brethren in the South. I find that they want my relationship, but they want more to quickly forget the brutality and the injustice that their people put upon many of us . . ..

Ours is not a story of bitterness — it is a story of love and the triumphs of the God of love. But it is a story carved out of the realities of violence and poverty, ending not in some sugarcoated sense of brotherly love but the deep conviction that only the power of Christ’s crucifixion on the cross and the glory of His resurrection can heal the deep racial wounds in both block and white people in America.

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“Reconciliation,” Matthew Henry’s Commentary points out, “is our indispensable duty.”  This ministry, of course, is not possible for those who are not regenerated.

Jesus is the Prince of Peace — Sar Shalom (Isaiah 9:6). I am reminded that reconciliation may be needed in every single relationship at some point (often daily). Christians are compelled to seek reconciliation with one another.

Restoration.

Unity.

Shalom.

The only hope for mankind is the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I pray for grace to train Moriah to love as she ought and to see what matters most.

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Elaine and her husband, Joey, are licensed as an adoptive family and foster home in Ohio. Learn more about Joey and Elaine.

 

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